Volume 5, Issue 6, November 2016, Page: 271-276
Effects of Pulverized Fuel Ash and Condensed Silica Fume on Heat Generation of Curing Concrete
J. J. Chen, Department of Civil Engineering, Foshan University, Foshan, China
H. N. Chen, Space Structures Research Center, Guizhou University, Guiyang, China
L. G. Li, School of Civil and Transportation Engineering, Guangdong University of Technology, Guangzhou, China
Received: Nov. 4, 2016;       Published: Nov. 5, 2016
DOI: 10.11648/j.ijmsa.20160506.16      View  2845      Downloads  77
Abstract
The heat generated during the curing period of concrete may results in early thermal cracking. To avoid or at least alleviate this early thermal cracking problem, replacing part of cement by cementitious materials should be an effective method. Herein, it is proposed to add PFA or CSF as cement replacement to lower the cement content and heat generated from the hydration of cement. To study the effectiveness of adding PFA or CSF in reducing the heat generation of curing concrete, a series of concrete mixes with water/cement ratios ranging from 0.24 to 0.40 and different amounts of PFA or CSF added were tested for their heat generation. The results illustrated that the addition of PFA or CSF as cement replacement could effectively reduce the adiabatic temperature rise and heat generation of curing concrete, while the addition of CSF is much more effectively than addition of PFA in reducing heat generation at the same strength.
Keywords
Condensed Silica Fume, Temperature Rise, Pulverized Fuel Ash
To cite this article
J. J. Chen, H. N. Chen, L. G. Li, Effects of Pulverized Fuel Ash and Condensed Silica Fume on Heat Generation of Curing Concrete, International Journal of Materials Science and Applications. Vol. 5, No. 6, 2016, pp. 271-276. doi: 10.11648/j.ijmsa.20160506.16
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